Miles of information for medical librarians #medlibs

Last Saturday, I had the wonderful opportunity of presenting at the Diabetes University, “Get Fit and Stay Healthy” on October 1, 2013. The  Diabetes University has been held in Columbus, Georgia, for 16 years. It is presented by the Southern Diabetes Foundation and Columbus Research Foundation. It is great to see this type of event has been offered to the community for so long. The event is actually a two day conference with the first day focused on professionals in the health care field, and day two focuses on those in the community. Additionally, many physicians took time out of their Saturday to present about diabetes and health to the community. I think though, I was the only one tweeting the event.

For me, it was a great opportunity to discuss how technology can not only be fun but help people stay fit and healthy. Of course, I couldn’t present about technology and health without talking about NLM, MedlinePlus, and the local library. I was also excited that I did not go over my allotted time! I said I would post the presentation so here it is:

 

The slides are mostly screen shots of various apps, websites, tech, etc. I think it shows kind of how the flow went. I had about 20 minutes to run through all of this and discuss how technology can help people stay fit. I also had to break down a few things to explain “the cloud,” “apps,” etc. as I was talking to an audience with mixed levels of tech experience. It certainly kept me on my toes.

I think the presentation went well overall. I had a few people asking me to come back to speak to the health professionals, which is great. I saw several people in the audience writing down some of the apps, especially the fun apps. Any time we can get out in front of the community to talk about health, fitness, tech, and the library is IMO always a good thing.

Introducing: PubMed Commons

Did you hear the news this morning? At 11:00 am on October 22, 2013, PubMed has released the all new PubMed Commons, by invitation only. It is a pilot program so we will see how it all goes.

“PubMed Commons is a system that enables researchers to share their opinions about scientific publications. Researchers can comment on any publication indexed by PubMed, and read the comments of others. PubMed Commons is a forum for open and constructive criticism and discussion of scientific issues. It will thrive with high quality interchange from the scientific community. PubMed Commons is currently in a closed pilot testing phase, which means that only invited participants can add and view comments in PubMed.”

I think this is a neat idea, but I just wonder if it is going to create more noise or help?

Will PubMed Commons have more appeal since it is being targeted at a limited audience? Or will it also be discontinued like Medpedia and Google Sidewiki? Medpedia was a place for approved clinicians/scientist to create a medical wikipedia. The site eventually shut down due to lack of interest. There was also little to show for how useful it was or if people were even using it. Google previously created a similar feature, Google Sidewiki but discontinued this product in December 2011.

In addition to the failure of Medpedia and Google Sidewiki, many journal vendors publish comments on their pages. There is even a new string of Journal Club apps that allow clinicians/scientist to publish comments. Or you could log into items such as QuantiaMD or Doximity to see what others are reading/commenting about.

Will PubMed commons be more successful since it is tied to PubMed? If PubMed Commons catches on it could be successful or it could just create more noise on the internet that no one reads. Then what happens to the comments published on say, NEJM’s website? How would those get tied back into PubMed Commons? Would it really create a place to bring together all the comments or just another place to add more reviews?

I am interested to see how this progresses. I think if PubMed works on creating some additional features to add to PubMed Commons it might be more successful. For instance: iPad app, magazine app (or integration into Flipboard), ability to tweet/facebook/share comments, ability to subscribe to comments on your article, ability to receive alerts when someone comments on an article you published (or any article), ability to confirm the person commenting identity, etc. These are just a couple of questions I have so far, and a couple of possible suggestions for PubMed Commons.

The last one is really a key point. If you cannot confirm who wrote the comment, then this could all just create more spam and noise. As I do not yet have an invitation to the pilot, I cannot say how they are confirming people’s identity. I also cannot comment on if there is a way to share or do the other items I listed above. Check out this post to see a great discussion on identity, possible need for anonymity, and other concerns.

Making it easy for people to add comments is also key. If it is too difficult or only accessible from a PC, and/or if it is not an easy to use/read interface then this might now catch on (and I am wondering if this will catch on) with many scientist which is vital for this to succeed. Again, just my initial thoughts before I have a chance to really see and review PubMed Commons. Have any of my #medlibs friends had a chance to review this new resource?

I do not currently have an invite to try the PubMed Commons Pilot. If someone wants to send me an invite… I would appreciate it! For now, please take a look at Hilda Bastian’s post for details about the new PubMed Commons Pilot.

 Other articles on PubMed Commons and Links:

On Saturday, November 21, October 19, I am doing a short presentation at a diabetes conference in Columbus, GA, about using technology to help you stay healthy. I was asked to speak at the community event to discuss with attendees about the various technology available to help people stay healthy whether they are currently living with diabetes, trying to prevent diabetes, or just interested in living a healthy life.

How did I get asked? I gave a presentation to a group of nurses and nurse educators about library resources, and one of the attendees asked if I would be interested in speaking at the local diabetes conference.

It is an excellent opportunity to speak to the community on this subject. Of course, I have been given 20 minutes to talk and I have several items I want to cover:

  1. Fitness Apps
    1. MapMyFitness
    2. MyFitnessPal
    3. Fitbit, Runkeeper, Nike, or just use Moves
  2. Food Apps & Sites
    1. Fooducate
    2. Diabetic Audio Recipes
    3. Tastemade
  3. Diabetes
    1. Glooko Logbook
    2. dLife
    3. MyNetDiary
    4. BlueLoop
    5. Glucose Buddy
    6. Carb Counting with Lenny (for kids)
    7. Mysugr
    8. WaveSense Diabetes Manager
    9. Diabetic Connect
  4. Tech for fun
    1. Local library resources & apps
    2. ifttt.com

And of course I could not do a presentation without mentioning MedlinePlus and other NLM resources.

So these are just the main items I have been reviewing and considering presenting. I wanted to hear from the rest of you, what apps do you use to stay healthy? Recommendations for other items people would find useful? Comments about the items listed above (pros/cons)?

Again, this is a great opportunity and I am excited to talk to the community about how technology can improve their health. I will of course post my presentation online after the event for others to review.

COMO Exhibit

NN/LM sent us a rocket ship!

Image

Actually what NN/LM SE/A did was provide us with an award to be able to exhibit at COMO. Additionally, they sent us a banner to use for our exhibit. So if knowledge can take you anywhere, then yes they sent us a rocket ship. 

Mercer University is presenting resources from the National Library of Medicine at COMO (The Council of Medical Organizations) today and tomorrow. The great thing is this conference is typically attended by several public libraries. It provides us with an opportunity to network NLM resources to other types of libraries. 

We are not only handing out information about these resources at the conference, but Carolann Curry is discussing with the attendees how they can obtain similar resources in their libraries and how they can become members of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine SE/A region

So thank you to NN/LM SE/A for providing us this opportunity to conduct outreach to other libraries.  If you are attending #GACOMO please stop by booth #26 to see the NN/LM resources and Carolann!

 

COMO2

Well, even though we have all been caught up in the government shutdown discussions, the twitter chats will continue this week. There are actually two chats going on this week that caught my interest.

#Medlibs 

  1. When: Thursday, October 3, 9:00 PM (EST) (Typically weekly on Thursday at 9:00 PM EST)
  2. Topic: Autumn App Harvest
  3. Suggested Topics:
    1. FDA Press Release regarding Medical Apps
    2. What medical apps are you, physicians, residents, nurses, medical and nursing students using?
    3. Are there non-medical apps that you’re recommending medical staff to consider using?
    4. How are you sharing app reviews to library users?
    5. How are you promoting apps to your library users?

Last week’s medlibs chat was awesome. It combined the #medlibs and #meded twitter chats, and we had more clinicians participating in the discussion. I hope we continue to have clinicians participating in the discussion as we discuss apps this week.

When I present to patrons, I always include information about at least 1 app I’ve been using. I could present a 15 minute session, and I still squeeze in time to discuss a new app. You could say it is the geek in me, but it is also noticing the trends in the field at this time.

As I see each new group of students and residents start, I notice each group, for the most part, seems more tech savvy than the group before them. We have some students right now who code to relax and take a break from medical school.

So I am excited to discuss this topic this week.

#mladisparities

  1. When: Wednesday, October 2, 8:00 PM (EST) (Typically 1st Wednesday of every month at 8:00 PM EST)
  2. Topic: Health disparities
  3. Interviewing: Myrna Morales, Technology Coordinator at the NN/LM New England Region

I am curious what will be covered during this Twitter Chat. I have seen several people discussing lately the difficulty of living on food stamps.  I wonder if this trend of people doing the “SNAP Challenge” or “Food Stamp Diet.” Even Panera Bread Company’s CEO has been doing the “SNAP Challenge.”  Join the chat tonight to find out!

 

Other Twitter Chats

If you are curious about other health related twitter chats, then please check out the list on Symplur.com. There are multiple Twitter Chats on various subjects throughout the week.

Updating and moving the list to the front of this post for use:

*Update as of 10/1/13 12:00 EST*

As of 12 pm EST, Vanderbilt has a great summary on the information resources not available, and The Krafty librarian has a short post up about the shut downs (thanks for the link back!)

Here are a few more for the updates that affect Medical Librariess, this list is not meant to be all inclusive. Please refer to the http://www.usa.gov for official updates on resources and additional information:

  1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) 
    1. “Due to the temporary shutdown of federal government services, this web site will not be updated or maintained until government operations are authorized to resume.”
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    1. Due to the lapse in government funding, only web sites supporting excepted functions will be updated unless otherwise funded. As a result, the information on this website may not be up to date, the transactions submitted via the website may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at http://www.usa.gov.
    2. CDC will also not be able to produce weekly report on items such as tracking influenza, or track outbreaks across states. Heard CDC report this on ABC. This means they MMWR will not be posted until the government resumes.
  3. CDC Wonder
    1. What is Wonder? “CDC WONDER is a system for disseminating Public Health data and information.”
    2. Update: While the CDC.gov site is not down, wonder.cdc.gov is down.
      1. “CDC WONDER is not available due to federal government shutdown.”
    3. Website not available!
  4. ClinicalTrials.gov
    1. “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this website may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the website may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at http://www.usa.gov.”
  5. Docline.gov
    1. “NLM is Closed
    2. Due to the lapse in government funding, NLM ILL accounts are temporarily inactive to prevent possible delays in the routing of requests. DOCLINE remains available.
    3. NLM staff will not be able to respond to ILL requests or DOCLINE customer service inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at USA.gov.
    4. If you experience a problem in DOCLINE, please check yourDOCLINE browser settings.”
  6. ERIC.ed.gov
    1. “Dear Users, Due to a lapse of appropriations and the partial shutdown of the Federal Government, the systems that host eric.ed.gov have been shut down. Services will be restored as soon as a continuing resolution to provide funding has been enacted.”
    2. Website not available!
    3. Some have reported you can still search ERIC on EBSCO, but when you try to link out to anything in ERIC it does not work.
    4. Update: EBSCO Information Services Releases a Complimentary Version of ERIC To Provide Access During the Government Shutdown
  7. FDA.gov
    1. “Due to the Government shutdown, information on this website may not be up to date. For information about Government services, visit USA.gov.”
  8. Grants.gov
    1. GRANTS.GOV ALERT: Grants.gov Operational Status The Department of Health and Human Services anticipates that the Grants.gov system will remain in an operational status, but with reduced federal support staff presence, should a lapse in appropriations occur. In addition, we anticipate that the Grants.gov Contact Center will remain available, and provide assistance to callers. HHS, as Managing Partner, in collaboration with OMB and the Grants.gov Program Management Office, will keep the federal grantor community updated as to the status of the Grants.gov system as plans evolve in the event of a government shutdown.”
    2. New update with additional details: 
      1. “The Government Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 ended on September 30, 2013 at midnight EST and an Appropriation Act for FY2014 has not been passed leading to a lapse in Federal funding.  We are providing the following information to answer questions you may have on the impact this lapse in appropriation will have on your grant/cooperative agreement or the availability of NIH’s systems and services.”
  9. Library of Congress
    1. “Due to the temporary shutdown of the federal government, the Library of Congress is closed to the public and researchers beginning October 1, 2013 until further notice. All public events are cancelled and web sites are inaccessible except the legislative information sites THOMAS.gov and beta.congress.gov.”
    2. Website not available!
  10. MedlinePlus
    1. “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at USA.gov.”
  11. NCBI – including databases such as Gene, SNP, and BLAST
    1. “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at http://www.usa.gov.“
  12. NLM
    1. “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at USA.gov.”
  13. The National Network of Libraries of Medicine
    1. “NN/LM SE/A (and other RML offices) are not affected by the government shutdown and is open during regular business hours 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM ET on weekdays.”
  14. PubMed.gov
    1. “PubMed has been designated to be maintained with minimal staff during the lapse in government funding. The information on this website will be kept as up to date as possible, and the agency will attempt to respond to urgent operational inquiries during this period. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at http://www.usa.gov.” Update status changes on 10/2/2013
    2. “PubMed is open, however it is being maintained with minimal staffing due to the lapse in government funding. Information will be updated to the extent possible, and the agency will attempt to respond to urgent operational inquiries. For updates regarding government operating status see USA.gov.”
    3. Yes this mean anything published/retracted today that has not been previously indexed will not be added until the government resumes normal operating procedures.
  15. PubMed Central
    1. “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at http://www.usa.gov.“
  16. PubMed Health
    1. “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at http://www.usa.gov.“
  17. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)
    1. “Due to the temporary shutdown of federal government services, this web site will not be updated or maintained until government operations are authorized to resume.”
  18. U.S. Census Bureau
    1. Website not available!
    2. “Due to the lapse in government funding, census.gov sites, services, and all online survey collection requests will be unavailable until further notice. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at <usa.gov>Websites affected by this shutdown are all census.gov hosted websites, including:
      1. Census.gov
      2. American Factfinder
      3. Public API
      4. FTP Servers
      5. FAQs
      6. Blogs
      7. Online Surveys
      8. Federal Statistical Organization websites: FCSMFedStats and MapStats
  19. @archiveitorg started a Google Docs List.
    1. The list consist of Twitter accounts, websites, etc. that are affected by the government shut down. It is kind of long and there is some repetition, but a good list.

*The information below was originally posted on 9/30/2013 at 17:54 and may be outdated now, but does include the original scramble for information.*

The potential government shut down has several people scrambling, including even librarians who rely heavily on government provided resources.  Several people have tweeted questions about the possible government shut down. I just wanted to recap here a little of what we know will happen and what we think will happen with NLM resources if the government shuts down.

Docline

Docline has sent out official word on various email lists that the Docline system will still be available if the during government shuts down; however, NLM’s and all government libraries will be set to temporarily inactive. The NLM library will be is closed if during the government shuts down. I would also then think the NLM Help Desk would not be available.

Docline has requested that any libraries impacted by a lapse in government funding should submit an Out of Office request in Docline today if possible or at least by tomorrow. So the RML’s should brace themselves for a mass flood of “Out of Office” request for Docline.  Please note your regional medical libraries will be available. The RML, NN/LM is funded by a contract from NLM and will not be affected.

Image

*Docline & NLM Update*

Docline now has the official statement on their webpage too, and I appreciate that they provide some instruction for what to do if you encounter issues during this time!

“NLM is Closed

Due to the lapse in government funding, NLM ILL accounts are temporarily inactive to prevent possible delays in the routing of requests. DOCLINE remains available.

NLM staff will not be able to respond to ILL requests or DOCLINE customer service inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at USA.gov.

If you experience a problem in DOCLINE, please check yourDOCLINE browser settings.”

2013.10 Docline

PubMed

There has been no official word from PubMed about how a possible government shut down will affect this resource. We can only assume that the website will still be functioning, but the help desk will not be staffed and there will be no updates made to PubMed during the shut down. Again, there is no official news. This is based off of what Docline’s response has been to the situation and what has happened in the past in similar situations.

*PubMed UPDATE*

Pubmed now has a message posted on their website

“PubMed has been designated to be maintained with minimal staff during the lapse in government funding. The information on this website will be kept as up to date as possible, and the agency will attempt to respond to urgent operational inquiries during this period.

Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at http://www.usa.gov.“

2013.10.01 PubMed

MedlinePlus

Again, no official news. I would assume the same for MedlinePlus as I have stated for PubMed.

*MedlinePlus Update*

MedlinePlus now has a message on their website:

“Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted. Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at USA.gov.”

2013.10.01 MedlinePlus

If anyone has more official news about these resources please post them on twitter and use the hashtag #medlibs. I will update this post as well when I have more information. In the meantime, I am thinking about all of my fellow #medlibs who are not sure when they will be reporting back to work.

*Eric.ed.gov UpDate*

At least PubMed, MedlinePlus, and Docline websites are still available. Eric.ed.gov has been shut down until further notice:

2013.10 ERIC

What is ERIC? For this we have to refer to Wikipedia since ERIC is shut down:

The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) – is an online digital library of education research and information. ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences of the United States Department of Education.

Thank goodness the NLM resources are still available!

*Updated post on 10/1/13 with official news from PubMed, MedlinePlus, Docline and also included information that the government did shut down as of midnight on 9/30/13.*

Nikki, @eagledawg, is amazing. She started the #medlibs weekly chat and has not only kept it going for months, but also been responsive to people’s request for topics to the point of responding lightening fast.

  • 9/24 JAMA article hit the internet 9/24 & #medlibs start tweeting about the article
  • 9/24 at 9:04 pm: @RyanMadanickMD sent a tweet at 9:04 pm asking to combine the #medlibs and #meded chat to discuss the JAMA article.
  • 9/24 at 9:25 pm: Just 21 minutes later, Nikki had a post up about the combined chat.

WOW!

Ok Niki, if you can make scheduling arrangements that fast, then I can at least show up to this #medlibs chat.  I have set my alarm on my phone this time (loud annoying noise). I cannot wait to discuss this article with other #medlibs, but also cannot wait since it is a combined chat with #medlibs and #meded, and it is being lead by a physician.

If you haven’t already read the JAMA article, I highly suggest reading it. It is a quick read and definitely a thought provoking article.

I am particularly interested in discussing this line:

“Librarian training must also be addressed, with competencies defined, clinical domain education expanded, and ethical concerns related to confidentiality and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act discussed.”

I am curious to hear others thoughts on how we can improve librarian training. Perhaps additional courses in medical terminology, or other items.

 

Thanks to Nikki’s quick arrangements, we get to continue the discussion online tomorrow during #medlibs twitter chat at  9 pm EST. “See” you there!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,254 other followers

%d bloggers like this: